Ring-tailed Lemur (Lemur catta)



Distribution:
Madagascar Africa.

General Info:
The best known of all the lemurs. They are about 45 cm long, covered in grey fur, with a black and white stripey tail. Like all lemurs the hands and feet are soft and have nails, just as we do.
Ring-tailed lemurs often feed in trees (arboreal), but also on the ground. Many of the trees and bushes in which they feed are very spiny, yet somehow they avoid the spines as the jump from branch to branch.

As one of the most vocal primates, the ring-tailed lemur uses numerous vocalizations including group cohesion and alarm calls. Experiments have shown that the ring-tailed lemur, despite the lack of a large brain (relative to simiiform primates), can organize sequences, understand basic arithmetic operations and preferentially select tools based on functional qualities.

 

White-fronted Brown Lemurs (Eulemur albifrons)



Distribution:
This lemur is only found in north-eastern Madagascar.

General Info:
They survive on a diet of fruits, flowers, flower seeds, leaves and nectar. The White-Fronted lemur is diurnal and mostly active during the day and early evening hours. They travel in groups of 4 to 15 individuals. Breeding season is from April to June for this type of lemur with single babies born between August and October. The gestation period is 127 days. For the first three weeks of its life, a young lemur hangs onto its mother's belly, altering its grasp only to nurse. After three weeks have passed, it shifts and rides on the mother's back. It then starts to take its first steps. Following this, it starts to sample solid food, nibbling on whatever the other members of the group happen to be eating

Habitat:
This lemur is mostly found in moist lowland rainforests. The white-fronted lemur is arboreal and spends most of its time in the upper layers of the forest
Black & White Ruffed Lemur (Vvarecia Variegata) “Spooky and Sue”



Distribution:
Only on Madagascar.

General Info:
It may be hard to believe but the black and white patches actually provide good camouflage in the dark shadowy forest. It's quite difficult to spot them if they don't want to be seen. Black and White Ruffs from different parts of Madagascar often have different patterns of patches, and the pattern on their left and right sides are not always the same. The thick soft woolly fur keeps them warm and dry even in heavy rain. Ruffs are among the largest of all living lemurs.

Habitat:

Only in mountainous rainforests on the eastern coast of Madagascar. Add your content here
Alpacas (Vicugna pacos)

Distribution:
Alpacas are kept in herds that graze on the level heights of the Andes of southern Peru.

General Info:
Alpacas have been domesticated for thousands of years. Along with camels and llamas, alpacas are classified as camelids. Alpacas are too small to be used as pack animals. Instead, they are bred exclusively for their fiber and meat. Alpacas generally eat hay or grasses, but can eat some other plants (e.g. some leaves). Alpacas are social herd animals that live in family groups consisting of a territorial alpha male, females and their young. Alpacas warn the herd about intruders by making sharp, noisy inhalations that sound like a high pitched bray. The herd may attack smaller predators with their front feet, and can spit and kick.

Habitat:
High in the mountains (12,000-16,000 feet about sea level). There is very little vegetation, thin air, and extreme temperatures (hot and cold)
Prarie Dogs (Genus Cynomys) “Our totally ‘hot’ dogs”



Distribution:
Throughout most of the western United States from Canada to Mexico.

General Info:
Prairie Dogs have a high-pitched, bark-like call. Recent studies suggest that Prairie Dogs possess the most sophisticated of all natural animal languages. They apparently issue different sounds identifying various predators, which include hawks, owls, eagles, ravens, coyotes, badgers, ferrets and snakes. While the have been known to attack and kill Prairie Dogs can run up to 35 miles per hour for short distances. The Prairie Dog has only one defense that works -- raising the alarm and disappearing quickly.

Habitat:

Short and medium grass prairies and plateaus of the American West.
Meerkats (Suricata suricatta)

General Info:
The meerkat or suricate is a small carnivoran belonging to the mongoose family (Herpestidae)
At the end of each of a meerkat's "fingers" is a non-retractable, strong, 2 centimetres (0.79 in) long, curved claw used for digging burrows and digging for prey. Claws are also used with muscular hindlegs to help climb trees. Meerkats have four toes on each foot and long slender limbs. The coat is usually fawn-colored peppered with gray, tan, or brown with a silver tint. They have short parallel stripes across their backs, extending from the base of the tail to the shoulders. The patterns of stripes are unique to each meerkat. The underside of the meerkat has no markings, but the belly has a patch which is only sparsely covered with hair and shows the black skin underneath. The meerkat uses this area to absorb heat while standing on its rear legs, usually early in the morning after cold desert nights.

Habitat:
Meerkats live in all parts of the Kalahari Desert in Botswana, in much of the Namib Desert in Namibia and southwestern Angola, and in South Africa

Llama (Lama glama)

Distribution:
The Llama is a domesticated South American camelid, widely used as a meat and pack animal by Andean cultures since pre-Hispanic times.

General Info:
The height of a full-grown, full-size llama is 1.7 to 1.8 m (5.5 to 6.0 ft) tall at the top of the head, and can weigh between 130 and 200 kg (280 to 450 lb).
They are very social animals and live with other llamas as a herd. The wool produced by a llama is very soft and lanolin-free. Llamas are intelligent and can learn simple tasks after a few repetitions. When using a pack, they can carry about 25% to 30% of their body weight for 8–13 km (5–8 miles).

Guard behavior:
Using llamas as livestock guards in North America began in the early 1980s, and some sheep producers have used llamas successfully since then in areas where larger predators, such as the coyote as well as feral dogs, are prevalent. Typically, a single gelding (castrated male) is used.
Bruno our Micro Pig

General Info:
The popularity of miniature pigs grew in the 1980s, with pet potbellied pigs appearing everywhere from New York apartment complexes to small hobby farms. However, the trend was short-lived, mostly due to city ordinances forbidding raising farm animals within the city limits. Furthermore, many owners came to realize that even a 165 pound pig was difficult to handle in most housing situations.

Breeding history:
In the UK, British micro pigs have been bred since 1992. Chris Murray, of Devon, England, spent 9 years on his Pennywell farm  crossbreeding the Vietnamese Potbelly with the kunekune, the Gloucestershire Old Spots and the Tamworth in an effort to create a smaller pig that would make a suitable pet. After 24 generations he came up with his own version of the miniature pig, which he originally called a Pennywell and then later the "teacup pig", apparently after discovering that they shared his love of tea. Murray unveiled this miniature pig in 2007 and began selling teacup pigs in pairs as pets to anyone who could afford them.
Coypu (Myocastor coypus)

General Info:
Originally native to subtropical and temperate South America, it has since been introduced to North America, Europe, Asia, and Africa.
The distribution of coypus tends to contract or expand with successive cold or mild winters. During cold winters, coypus often suffer frostbite on their tails, leading to infection or death.
Besides breeding quickly, each coypu consumes large amounts of vegetation. An individual consumes about 25% of its body weight daily, and feeds year-round. Being one of the world's larger extant rodents, a mature, healthy coypu averages 5.4 kg (12 lb) in weight, but they can reach as much as 10 kg (22 lb).

Habitat:
Coypus are found most commonly in freshwater marshes, but also inhabit brackish marshes and rarely salt marshes

Pygmy Goat (Capra Hircus) “The Cute Small Fellas”



Distribution:
The Pygmy goat originated in Africa.

General Info:

The Pygmy Goat is hardy, alert and animated, good-natured and gregarious; a docile, responsive pet, a cooperative provider of milk, and an ecologically effective browser. Pygmy Goats are friendly when they want to be and always comical if you have a good sense of humor. Sometimes they will do things that you don't necessarily think is cute but it is rather difficult to train them to stop doing goat things, But it is not impossible, because after all a goat does have an I.Q. of 60. By goat things I mean, like jumping on your car, pulling your clothes off your clothes line, or eating your favorite rose bush. Of course they do these things only because they are curious, not because they don't like you.

Habitat:

Anywhere where there is grass.  
Soya (Soay) Sheep (Ovis Aries L.)



Distribution:
The Soay have been called the only living example of the small, primitive sheep which inhabited the British Isles before the coming of the Norsemen and the Romans. Their name is derived from the island of Soay off the coast of Scotland.

General Info:
The males of this breed are horned and the females may be either polled or horned. The fleece is remarkable fine and, in contrast to mouflon, the inner fleece is highly developed and it is difficult to distinguish a outer coat. This is a clear indication that the Soay are indeed the product of a breed domesticated in prehistoric times. The breed also lacks the flocking instinct of many breeds. Attempts to work them using sheep dogs result in a scattering of the group.

Habitat:
Anywhere where there is grass.
White-faced Sakis (Pithecia pithecia)



Disribution:
Brazil, French Guiana, Guyana, Suriname, Venezuela.

General Info :
The difference between the sexes is considerable. Adult males are black, with the striking white face. The females are brownish-grey and have only a narrow white stripe on the face between the inner eye and mouth. Colour differences like this between the sexes are termed 'sexual dichromatism'. They have long, shaggy coats and non-prehensile, long bushy tails. Adult males weigh around 2 kg females are slightly smaller at 1.7 kg These arboreal (tree-living) monkeys are fast moving and shy, so very little is known about their behaviour in the wild. They move mainly in leaps and jumps of up to 10m have been recorded, native people call them 'flying monkeys' for this reason. They are active during the daytime (diurnal).
Bennett Wallaby (Marcopus Rufogriseus) “Whizzer and Dot”



Distribution:
Found in coastal woodlands and open forest of South Eastern Australia, Tasmania and the surrounding islands.

General Info:
This is a solitary animal but may be seen in large groups when feeding. Bennett Wallabies are primarily nocturnal. When confined to smaller areas, a group of females will get along but males become aggressive towards one another. Wallabies may become easily startled. Animal care personnel take care to make certain their presence is known and to give the animals adequate room to move away.

Habitat:
Bennett Wallabies are widely distributed across Australia, particularly in more remote, heavily timbered, or rugged areas, less so on the great semi-arid plains that are better suited to the larger, leaner, and more fleet-footed kangaroos.  
Maras (Dolichotis Patagonum)



Distribution:
Central and southern Argentina.

General Info:
Maras are terrestrial and diurnal. During a study they found that individuals rested at night in wooded areas and then travelled to open grassland to feed during the day. Dolichotis uses a variety of locomotion’s: walking when undisturbed, hopping like a rabbit or hare, galloping, and stotting--a sort of bounce on all four limbs at once--for covering long distances at high speed. A Mara was clocked once running beside a car at 45 km/hr over a distance exceeding 1 km. It spends considerable time basking in the sun but is ever on the alert for danger.

Habitat:
Mara’s inhabit arid areas with coarse grass or scattered shrubs. They shelter in burrows of their own construction or in the abandoned holes of other animals.
Racoon



Distribution:
They are found throughout the United States except for large parts of some of the western states, they are omnivorous.

General Info:
Raccoons live near streams, lakes, and marshes. Raccoons prefer swampy areas or woods near water and are absent from very high elevations and very arid regions. Two of the raccoon's most distinctive features are its extremely dexterous front paws and its facial mask, which are themes in the mythology of several Native American tribes. Raccoons are noted for their intelligence, with studies showing that they are able to remember the solution to tasks for up to three years.

Habitat:
They normally prefer the use of hollow trees or logs, rock crevices, abandoned animal burrows for dens
Ring Tailed Mundi (Nasua nasuaa)



Distribution:
There are four species of coati all living in the New World. They are found in the southwestern U.S., Mexico, Central and tropical regions of South America, from Columbia and Venezuela to Uruguay, northern parts of Argentina, and into Ecuador.

General Info:
The Coati Mundi, also known as the White-nosed Coati, is diurnal, living both on the ground and in the trees. This member of the racoon family is omnivorous, feeding on fruits, invertebrates, and other small animals. They feed by using their long noses, poking them under rocks and into crevices, and using their long claws to dig holes or tear apart rotting logs. The coati often is seen in large groups of up to 30 individuals. When surprised, the entire group will leap into the trees while emitting clicking and explosive "woofs" type of sounds.

Habitat:
Coati Mundis are found from the mangrove forests of the coasts, the savannas of the lowlands and the dense tropical forest of the interior.
Schipperke Dogs



General Info:
The Schipperke was bred in Flanders by a canal boat captain named Renssens. Thought to be descended from the same sheep-herding stock as the black Belgian Sheepdog, the Schipperke was bred smaller and smaller and eventually became a different breed entirely. It became a favorite choice to guard canal barges in Belgium. In Flemish Schipperke means "Little Skipper", or "Little Captain". This being so, because the dogs were the "ratters", a very important function on a canal barge, and also usually the captain's dog. Hence, the name of the little skipper.
The breed became very popular in Belgian households by the late 1800's. It first appeared at a dog show in 1880. From that point on it was exported throughout the world. Today he serves primarily as a companion dog. The Schipperke do very well on boats and people often get this breed to come along with them on boating and fishing trips. It makes a great guard dog when the boat anchors for the night, alerting of anything out of the ordinary and the dog thoroughly enjoys its trip.